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 A Allah Blessing Mianwali since 1901 is a District in the north-west of Punjab, Pakistan. It borders Lakki Marwat district in the west, Kohat and Kark districts in the North west and D.I Khan in the southwest. Attok lies in the north, Chakwal in the north east, Khushab in the east and Bhakkar in the south. In November 1901, the NWFP was carved out of Punjab and present day towns of Mianwali, Isa Khel, Kalabagh, and Kundian were separated from Bannu District (NWFP) and hence a new district was made with the headquarters in Mianwali city and placed in Punjab.

Demography <<Back to gulemianwali Home>> 0

The majority of the population is of Hindko origin similar to the people of Attock.Niazi Tribe is The Most Famouse Tribe of this District. Niazi Tribe is Mostly Living in The Mianwali City, Shahbaz Khel, Mosa Khel, Mochh,Utra Kalaan, Sawans. The Tribes who known as Jats are living in the Kacha and Thal speak a Hindko Seraiki, lived in all parts of the district but mostly in Waan Bacharaan, Kundian, Ding Khola, Khanqah Sirrajia, Saeed Abad, Bakharra/Kacha Kalo, Kacha paar,khita-e-Atlas, Kacha Gujrat, Kacha Shahnawaz Wala, Phaati, Hurnoli, Alluwali, Duaba, Jaal, Piplan, Wichveen Bala, Moosa Khel, Shadia and many others villages which are parts of the district. There are small minority of Pashtuns and Punajbis. Mostly people speak a unique dialect of Seraiki which borrows many words from Hindko and Pashto. However the Khattak tribes living in the suburbs of Isakhel, Chapri, Bhangi Khel, Sultan Khel, Makarwal and Bani Afghan are bilingual, Pashto being their primary language but can fairly communicate in Seraiki as well. Awans living in the Salt range of Mianwali speak a dialect of Potohari which is called "Uttraadi"(pertaining to the highlanders).

According to the 1998 census of Pakistan the district had a population of 1,056,620 of which 20.39%2 of which 85,000 inhabit the district capital.

Administration  <<Back to gulemianwali Home>>

Mianwali used to be the part of Bannu district but on November the 9th,1901 a new district was made with headquarters at Mianwali city.Deputy commissioner used to be the head of the district.The first deputy commissioner was Captain A.J.OBrainThe first district judge was Sardar Balwant Singh.It is worth mentioning that Capt.O'Brian served Mianwali not once but thrice.He was again given the charge of D.C.Mianwali in 1906 and then in 1914. This time he was promoted to the rank of Major.
The system continued even after the creation of Pakistan as a sovereign nation.It was not until year 2000 when the new local government system was introduced by the President of Pakistan Perves Musharaf.Three basic changes were made Divisions which used to be third tier of the government were abolished and more autonomy was given to the districts under the motive of devolution of power
With this new status of the districts Nazims were to become the administrators of the district with more authoritative powers.

The post of D.C. was abolished with the aim to put an end to the bureaucratic rule however the bureaucracy was offered an olive branch by creating a new post of District Co-ordinating Officer.However the Nazim remains the main elected representative and administrator while the D.C.Os serve as representatives of the government And now nazim are make their term complete and Govt of Punjab hold this system and Authorized DCO to get administration control till next new elections.

a The district is administratively divided into three Tehsils and 56 Union Counsels.

Tehsils & Unions in the District of Mianwali
Tehsil Unions Total Unions
Isakhel CHAPRI, ISAKHEL, KALABAGH, KALLUR, KAMAR MUSHANI, KAMAR MUSHANI PAKKA, KHAGLAN WALA, KOT CHANDNA, SULTAN KHEL, TABISAR, TANIKHEL, TOLA BHANGI KHEL, TRAG, VANJARI 14
Mianwali ABBAKHEL, BAN HAFIZ JEE, CHAKRALA, CHHIDRU, DAUD KHEL (RURAL), DAUD KHEL URBAN (TOWN), DHER UMID ALI SHAH, GULMIRI, MARI (MIANWALI), MIANALI CITY -I, MIANWALI CITY -III, MIANWALI CITY -IV, MIANWALI CIYT -II, MOCHH, MUSAKHEL, MUZAFARPUR JANUBI, MUZAFARPUR SHUMALI, NAMAL, PAIKHEL, QURESHIAN, ROKHRI, SHADIA, SHAHBAZ KHEL, SWANS, THAMEWALI, WAN BHACHRAN, WATTA KHEL, YARU KHEL 28
Piplan ALLUWALI, CHAK NO 7 ML AT HAFIZ, DABB BALOUCHAN, DOABA, GUJRAT, HERNOLI (RURAL), HERNOLI URBAN, KHOLA AT KHANQAH SIRAJIA, KUNDIAN -II, KUNDIAN RURAL, KUNDIAN-I, PIPLAN, TIBBA MEHRBAN SHAH, VICHVIN BALA 14
Total Number of Tehsils = 3 and Total Unions = 56

Name of Tehsil

Isakhel tehsil  <<Back to gulemianwali Home>>

Isakhel Tehsil is an administrative subdivision Tehsil of Mianwali District in the Punjab province of Pakistan The city of Isakhel is the headquarters of the tehsil which is administratively subdivided into 14 Union Council It is located between 32° 30′ and 33° 14′ N. and 71° 7′ and 71° 44′ E., with an area of 678 square miles (1,760 km2) and contains the towns of Isakhel, Kammar Mushani and Kalabagh

Mianwali Tehsil  <<Back to gulemianwali Home>>

Mianwali Tehsil is an administrative subdivision (tehsill) of Mianwali District in the Punjab province of Pakistan The tehsil is subdivided into 28 Union Councils - four of which form the capital Mianwali.

According to the 1901 census, compiled during British rule the population of the tehsil was 111,883 and contained 69 villages.

 References

^Tehsils & Unions in the District of Mianwali - Government of Pakistan

^Miānwāli Tahsīl - Imperial Gazetteer of India, v. 17, p. 326.

Piplan Tehsil  <<Back to gulemianwali Home>>

Piplan Tehsil is an administrative subdivision Tehsil of Mianwali  in the Punjab province of Pakistan The tehsil is subdivided into 14 Union Councils - one of which forms the capital Piplan

Geography

Mianwali district covers an area of 5,840 square kilometres. The area in north is a continuation of the Pothar plateou and the Kohistan Namak.                            The district consists of various towns, including Kalabagh Isa khel,Ding Khola (Khanqah Sirrajia), Kundian Pai Khel Piplan Kamar mushani Mouch Rokhri Harnoli Musa Khel Gul Miri Wan Bhachran Daud Khel and the district capital - Mianwali city.

Kalabagh is famous for the Kalabagh Dam and the Nawab Of Kalabaghand for the red hills of the salt range and scenic view of mighty Indus River  Kundian is the second largest town at a distance of 15 km from the city of Mianwali.There is a Chashma Nuclear power plant(Chashnupp)Ding Khola (PAEC),Kundian(Chashma)Barrage,K.J(Kundian Jehlum)Chashma Jehlum)Link Canal

Thal is a large area which is mostly desert and semi-arid. It is located between Jhelum and Indus river (The Sindh-Saagar Doab).                                The boundaries of the old district established in 1901 included almost 70 % of this great area, but after the separation of Layyah and then  Bhakkar Tehsils, only about20% remains in this district. First deputy commissioner Mr. A J O'Brian wrote in his memoirs, In 1901 the District of Mianwali was formed out of the two Punjab halves of two older districts, and I had the good fortune to be put in charge. It was a lonely District with, as my Assistant Mr. Bolster called it, 'three white men in a wilderness of sand.'"

Nammal (Namal) Lake is a place of interest for the hikers and holiday-makers in Chakrala Amongst fine views should be included that of the Indus and the eastern valley from a little conical hill at Mari, where the "Kalabagh diamonds" (quartz crystals) are found and which is crowned by an old Hindu ruin. Amongst picturesque spots may be mentioned Nammal, just beyond the Dhak Pass in Mianwali, also Kalabagh and Mari on the Indus, and Kotki in the throat of Chichali Pass. The average rainfall in the district is about 250 mm Isa Khel is another important town located in the west of Mianwali. It is a historical town named after Isa Khan a famous Niazi chief. Kamar Mushani is famous for its trade and minerals

Education

The city is an economic and commercial hub in the district. There are several educational institutions up to post-graduate level, affiliated with the  University of Punjab

Independent colleges & Universities in Mianwali 

Govt. Technical Training Institute, Mianwali                                                                                                                          Talagang Road Near Govt Degree College Wandhi Arayanwali, Mianwali                                                                 Govt. Vocational Training Institute (W), Mianwali                                                                                                              Dr. Azeem Street Near Inamullah Khan House Mianwali
Govt. Technical Training Centre, (ABAD), Isakhel, Mianwali
Mianwali Road Isakhel, District Mianwali
Govt. Vocational Training Institute (W), Isakhel, Mianwali
Mohallah Alam Khan, Isakhel, District Mianwali
Govt. College of Commerce, Mianwali
Near Govt.Poultry Form Mianwali
Govt. Institute of Commerce (W), Mianwali
Near Miana Antha Muslim Bazar Mianwali
Govt. Institute of Commerce, Isakhel, Mianwali
Mianwali Banu Road Isakhel

Weather

Whole of the district has extreme weather, summer last from May to September, June is the hottest month average temperature of month rise up to 42°C and maximum could go to 50°C whereas in winter, December and January temperature is as low as 3 to 4°C average per month

Month

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Year

Avg high °C

19

21

26

33

38

42

39

37

37

33

28

21

31

Avg low temperature °C

3

6

12

17

22

27

27

26

23

16

9

4

16

Rainfall in. (Cm)

1.6

2.1

4.1

2.4

1.9

1.8

7.6

11

4.5

0.7

0.1

0.9

38.5

History in Brief  <<Back to gulemianwali Home>>

Brief Overview

Traditionally all major rulers of South Asia governed this area in their turn. Mughal emperor Babur mentions Essa Khail (Isakhel) whilst he was fighting against the Pakistan as part of his campaign to conquer the Punjab during the 1520s (ref. Baburnama). Then came the Sikhs, that era was famous for lawlessness, and barbarism, they ruled until the annexation of Punjab in 1849 by the British. During British Rule, the Indian empire was subdivided into province, divisions and districts, (after the independence of Pakistan Divisions remained the third tier of government until 2000). The British had made the towns of Mianwali and Isa Khel tehsil headquarters of Bannu District then part of D.I.Khan of Punjab Province

The district of Mianwali was created in November 1901, when the N.W.F.P was carved out of Punjab and the towns of Mianwali, Isa Khel Kalabagh and Kundian were separated from Bannu District which became part of the NWFP. A new district was made with the headquarters in Mianwali city and placed in Punjab, the district became a part ofMultan Division Mianwali originally contained four Tehsils namely Mianwali, Isa Khel,Bhakkar, and Layyah, in 1909 Layyah  was transferred to Muzaffargarh District. The district became a part of Sargodha Division in 1961, in 1982 Bhakkar tehsil was removed from Mianwali and became a separate district of Sargodha Division.

ContactArea: 5,840 square km

Population:1,057,000 (1.06 mill)...According to 1998 Population and Housing Census, total population of Mianwali district is 1057 thousands persons out of which 530 thousands are males and 527 thousands are females. Density of population in the district is 181 persons per square Kilometre. Percentage break-up of the Rural and Urban population is 79.2 and 20.8 respectively
 

Climate:The district has extreme hot and cold climate. The maximum temperature during the summer shoots up to 51ýC while the minimum temperature recorded in winter is as low as 2ýC. The average rainfall in the district is about 250 mm.
 

Litercy rate:
26 to 33 percent
 

Main crops:
Wheat, Sugarcane, Gram, Guar Seed, Ground Nut, Rice, Cotton, Moong, Mash and Masoor seed.

Main fruits:
Citrus, Guavas, Mangoes, Jaman, Dates and Banana

Main Vegitable:
Turnip, Potato, Cauliflower, Peas, Bottle Gourd, Bitter Gourd, Chillies, Carrot, and Garlic

Forest:
40,020 Acres

Main Trees:
Mulbury, Bakain, Eucalyptus, Simbal, Popular, Sirin, Acacia, etc.

Metal Road:
868 km

Major Industries:
Cement, Cotton Ginning & Pressing, Drugs & Pharmaceuticals, Fertilizer, Flour Mills, Oil Mills and Power Generation

Mineral resources:
Limestone, Argillaceous Clay, Gypsum, Coal, Fireclay, Silica Sand, Iron Ore, Dolomite, Rock Salt, Bauxite and Ochers

Famous Points

Chashma Barrage: The Most famous visiting point about 15 km far from Mianwali
 Near Kundian City. Its a famous Barrage on the Indus River.

Jinnah Barrage:
Another Barrage near Kalabagh city 35 km from Mianwali on Islamabad Road near Kot chandna Distt. Mianwali.

 

PAKISTAN AIR FORCE WE PROUD ON IT PAF M M ALAM MIANWALI 

PAF honours ace pilot MM Alam, renames Mianwali air base after him


M M ALAM'S F-86 
1965 

Squadron Leader Muhammad Mahmud Alam emerged from 1965 War as Pakistan's top scoring fighter ace. The picture shows him in his favorite F-86 F-35-NA with the victory tally marked on the aircraft (Nine kills and two probable). Squadron Leader Muhammad Mahmud Alam, Commander of No 11 Squadron in 1965, was already a notable leader and highly experienced pilot. He also excelled in gunnery competition as a skill that without a doubt contributed greatly to his becoming the first and the only jet ace in one mission.
During the Indo-Pak war of 1965, Air Commodore MM Alam shot down seven and damaged three Indian aircraft in air-air battles, of which five aircraft were shot down in less than 60 seconds. For this act of outstanding bravery, he was awarded the Sitara-i-Jurat, and was one of the first aces of the PAF.
PAF Base Mianwali M M ALAM History: 1948-1988
During the 1965 war it was realized that Sargodha needed an alternate recovery airfield deeper inside Pakistani territory, and Mianwali was selected as the site for this new air base, partly because a WW II airstrip already existed there already. In addition to serving as a deeper airfield looking east, it would act as a front line base against a threat from the west. Initially it was conceived as a satellite airfield only. During the 1971 war, Mianwali played a very active role and contributed substantially to the war effort of the PAF. It was activated in October 1971 with Group Captain S M Dutta as its commander. Detachments of several types of aircraft operated from this' airfield during the war. The Indians found this airfield an attractive target and made regular raids on it for the first three days of war. However, after suffering heavy losses without causing any damage, the IAF discontinued its raids on Mianwali.
Mianwali's battle initiation occurred on the second day of the war. As a pair of F-6s was lining up for take off, 2 enemy Hunters pulled up for attack, having sneaked in undetected. The Hunters aimed at the lined up fighters but poor shooting left both F-6s untouched. As the Hunters pulled out of their attack and started exiting east at low level, one of the F-6 pilots Flight Lieutenant Javed Qazi took off in hot pursuit. Making up for lost time in full afterburner, Qazi never took his eyes off his targets and shot one of them down near Sakesar, about 40 miles from his home base. For his cool courage in precarious circumstances, he was awarded the Sitara-e-Juraat. During that war, another 4 Indian aircraft were destroyed and one damaged by the pilots and gunners, of this base.
In August 1974, Mianwali was upgraded from a satellite to a full-fledged operational base. Wing Commander Sultan Muhammad took over as the first base commander. It took about three more years to complete the remaining framework of a permanent operational base with facilities such as residential camps, messes, and technical complexes.
In November 1975, No. 1 Fighter Conversion Unit was shifted from PAF Base Masroor to Mianwali on a permanent basis and equipped with the Chinese FT-5 (Mig-17T) aircraft. The FCU was to undertake fighter conversion training of the PAF Academy graduates. Since then this unit has successfully carried out this task, and has trained over 500 fighter, pilots who form the backbone of the PAF combat force today.
The next unit to arrive at Mianwali was No. 14 Squadron in November 1976. The squadron was assigned the task of carrying out operational conversion of the graduates from No I FCU on their first single-seat fighter. No. 14 Squadron continued to perform this task till August 1986 when it was selected for re-equipment with F-16s and moved out of Mianwali. The F-6 OCU task is now in the hands of No. 25 Squadron. Several additional operational units and facilities have been added to the base during the 1980's.
 

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